Peppermint Leaf

Peppermint Leaf

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Traditionally Used for

A long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS). Most research shows that taking peppermint oil by mouth reduces stomach pain, bloating, gas, and bowel movements in people with IBS. Most trials have used specific peppermint oil products (Colpermin by Tillotts Pharma; Mintoil by Cadigroup; IBgard by IM HealthScience).

Possibly Effective for

Relaxing the colon during a barium enema examination. Using peppermint oil as an ingredient in enemas seems to relax the colon during barium enema examinations. Also, taking peppermint oil by mouth before the start of a barium enema seems to decrease spasms.

Hard, painful breasts in breast-feeding women. Research shows that breastfeeding women who apply peppermint oil in gel, cream, or water to their skin have less cracked skin and pain in the nipple area.

Indigestion (dyspepsia). Taking a specific product containing peppermint oil and caraway oil (Enteroplant or Menthacarin by Dr Willmar Schwabe Pharmaceuticals) by mouth seems to reduce feelings of fullness, discomfort, pain, and stomach spasms. It also appears to improve quality of life. Another specific combination product containing peppermint (Iberogast by Steigerwald Arzneimittelwerk GmbH) also seems to improve symptoms of heartburn, including severity of acid reflux, stomach pain, cramping, nausea, and vomiting. The combination includes peppermint leaf plus clown's mustard plant, German chamomile, caraway, licorice, milk thistle, angelica, celandine, and lemon balm. Another similar combination product containing peppermint leaf, clown's mustard, German chamomile, caraway, licorice, and lemon balm (STW 5-II by Steigerwald Arzneimittelwerk GmbH) also seems to help. However, peppermint oil does not seem to help indigestion when taken as a single ingredient after surgery.

Spasms caused by a certain procedure (endoscopy) used to view the inside of the body. Research shows that peppermint oil can reduce pain and spasms in people undergoing endoscopy, a procedure used to see within the gastrointestinal tract.

Tension headache. Applying peppermint oil to the skin seems to help relieve tension headaches.

Possibly Ineffective for

Nausea following surgery. Inhaling peppermint might relieve nausea by improving breathing patterns after surgery. However, inhaling peppermint oil does not seem to be more effective than inhaling alcohol or saline for reducing nausea after surgery.

Recovery following surgery. One study shows that taking a specific peppermint product (Copermin) three times daily for five days after surgery does not affect stomach bloating or heartburn. Another study shows that taking peppermint oil capsules does not relieve bloating or stomach pain following surgery.

Insufficient Evidence for

Hot flashes in people treated for breast cancer. Early research shows that a combination spray containing peppermint and other ingredients does not relieve hot flashes in most women receiving chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer.

Memory and thinking skills (cognitive function). Early research shows that inhaling peppermint oil slightly improves memory and performance on mental tasks, but does not improve attention and speed of completing tasks.

Tooth plaque. Early research shows that rinsing with a solution containing peppermint powder and other ingredients reduces plaque compared to a water solution. However, it doesn't work better than a solution containing chlorhexidine.

Spasm in the esophagus. Early research shows that drinking water containing five drops of peppermint oil stops spasms in the esophagus.

Bad breath. Early research shows that a specific combination of tea tree oil, peppermint, and lemon oil can improve breath smell when used for 3 minutes.

Swelling (inflammation) and sores inside the mouth (oral mucositis). Early research shows that rinsing the mouth with a combination of peppermint oil and German chamomile might decrease how severe mouth ulcers are and how long they last in patients undergoing a stem cell transplant. Also, rinsing the mouth with a combination of peppermint, sage, and thyme might delay how long it takes to get mouth ulcers after receiving chemotherapy with a drug called 5-fluorouracil.

Nausea and vomiting after surgery. Some early research shows that inhaling peppermint oil might relieve nausea after surgery. However, other research shows that inhaling peppermint oil does is not more effective than inhaling alcohol or saline. It's possible that any nausea relief seen with peppermint aromatherapy is due to improved breathing patterns rather than peppermint oil itself.

Itching. Early research shows that applying peppermint oil to the skin twice a day for 2 weeks decreases itching in patients with itching related to kidney disease, liver disease, or diabetes. Also, applying a gel containing peppermint oil, menthol, and methyl salicylate decreases itching in people with burn scars. Early research also shows that applying oil containing 0.5% peppermint oil can reduce the severity of itchy skin in women with pregnancy-related itching.

Stress. Early research shows that peppermint aromatherapy might reduce stress.

Bacteria overgrowth in the intestines.

Cough and symptoms of cold.

Infections.

Inflammation of mouth and respiratory tract lining.

Lung infections.

Morning sickness.

Muscle or nerve pain.

Nausea and vomiting.

Painful menstrual periods.

Toothaches.

 

Contraindications:  

A stomach condition in which the stomach is not producing hydrochloric acid (achlorhydria): Don't use enteric-coated peppermint oil if you have this condition. The enteric coating might dissolve too early in the digestive process.

 

Diarrhea: Taking enteric-coated peppermint oil could cause anal burning if you experience diarrhea.

 

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

 

!

Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

The body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) to get rid of it. Peppermint oil might decrease how quickly the body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). Taking peppermint oil products along with cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) might increase the risk of side effects for cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune).

 

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver<br /><br /> Peppermint oil and leaf might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking peppermint oil along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking peppermint oil, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver<br /><br /> Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), haloperidol (Haldol), ondansetron (Zofran), propranolol (Inderal), theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, others), and others.

 

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) substrates) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver<br /><br /> Peppermint oil might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking peppermint oil along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking peppermint oil, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver<br /><br /> Some medications that are changed by the liver include omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and pantoprazole (Protonix); diazepam (Valium); carisoprodol (Soma); nelfinavir (Viracept); and others.

 

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.<br /><br /> Peppermint oil might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking peppermint oil along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking peppermint oil, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.<br /><br /> Some medications that are changed by the liver include diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), and piroxicam (Feldene); celecoxib (Celebrex); amitriptyline (Elavil); warfarin (Coumadin); glipizide (Glucotrol); losartan (Cozaar); and others.

 

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.<br /><br /> Peppermint oil might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking peppermint oil along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking peppermint oil, talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver<br /><br /> Some medications changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

 

Minor Interaction

Be watchful with this combination

 

!

Antacids interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some peppermint oil products are covered with a special coating. Antacids are used to decrease stomach acid. Low stomach acid can cause the coating of these peppermint oil products to dissolve too quickly. When peppermint oil products dissolve too quickly they can sometimes cause heartburn and nausea. Take antacids at least two hours after coated peppermint oil products.<br /><br /> Some antacids include calcium carbonate (Tums, others), dihydroxyaluminum sodium carbonate (Rolaids, others), magaldrate (Riopan), magnesium sulfate (Bilagog), aluminum hydroxide (Amphojel), and others.

 

Medications that decrease stomach acid (H2-Blockers) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some peppermint oil products are covered with a special coating. Some medications that decrease stomach acid might cause the coating of these peppermint oil products to dissolve too quickly. When peppermint oil products dissolve too quickly they can sometimes cause heartburn and nausea. Take medications that decrease stomach acid at least two hours after coated peppermint oil products<br /><br /> Some medications that decrease stomach acid include cimetidine (Tagamet), ranitidine (Zantac), nizatidine (Axid), and famotidine (Pepcid).

 

Medications that decrease stomach acid (Proton pump inhibitors) interacts with PEPPERMINT

 

Some peppermint oil products are covered with a special coating. Some medications that decrease stomach acid might cause the coating of these peppermint oil products to dissolve too quickly. When peppermint oil products dissolve too quickly they can sometimes cause heartburn and nausea. Take medications that decrease stomach acid at least two hours after coated peppermint oil products<br /><br /> Some medications that decrease stomach acid include omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), rabeprazole (Aciphex), pantoprazole (Protonix), and esomeprazole (Nexium).

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Please consult with a physician or other healthcare professional regarding any medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options.